Category Archives: Organ Anniversary

Details of our Allen Digital Organ, and information on events celebrating it’s 40th Anniversary in 2011

Allen e-notes

Click the image to download October e-notes

Allen Organs have featured our own Church Organ in their October issue of the newsletter “e-notes” to commemorate it’s 40th Anniversary.  E-notes is available on-line at http://www.allenorgan.com/enotes/2011Oct/eNotes.html. You can subscribe to Allen e-notes here

Alternatively, you can click the logo above to download a PDF version of October e-notes.

The article on Williamwood has links to this website and also a link to an on-line video of me (Alan Mathew) playing the well-known hymn “Dear Lord and Father”

October Organ Recital

We are pleased to announce in our Organ Anniversary series details of an Organ Recital to be held on Saturday 1st October at 3pm.  Our recitalist will be Alan Mathew, Williamwood’s resident Organist & Choirmaster.

PROVISIONAL RECITAL PROGRAMME – Concert Diary Link

Postlude on the Hymn Tune Middlebury; Gilbert M Martin
from the Eight Preludes and Fugues; J S Bach
- Prelude and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 554
- Prelude and Fugue in G Major, BWV 557
from Douze pièces pour Grand Orgue; J Bonnett
- Romance sans paroles
from Deux petites pièces pour orgue (1910); Dubois
- Petite pastorale champenoise
- Prélude
from Pièces Nouvelles, livraison 6 no 2, Op. 90; Guilmant
- Paraphrase “See the conquering hero comes”
Fanfare for Organ; Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens
Two Arias
- Noel Rawsthorne
- Laurence Caldecote
Now thank we all our God; arr. Virgil Fox

Sunday 5 June 2011 at 6:30pm

Please see below the order of service for our Songs of Praise!

Come along and be part of our community choir -
hope to see you all there – Alan

ORDER OF SERVICE
(please stand if you are able as the bible is brought into the Church)
WELCOME AND CALL TO WORSHIP
HYMN 512 To God be the Glory (Doreen Lynas)
Prayer & Lord’s Prayer (traditional version)
SPECIAL OCCASSIONS
HYMN 485 Dear Lord and Father of Mankind (Eleanor MacKenzie)
HYMN 462 The King of Love my Shepherd is (Betty Patrick)
HYMN 519 Love divine, all loves excelling (The Yeoman’s)
FROM THE PSALTER
HYMN 478 Behold! The amazing gift of love (Ross Johnstone)
HYMN 715 Behold! The mountain of the Lord (Murdoch Hodge)
CONTEMPORARY PRAISE
HYMN 259 Beauty for Brokenness (Jimmy Craig)
HYMN 251 I, the Lord of sea and sky (Carole Lyons)
HYMN 448 Lord, the light of your love (Lesley Burgess)
LIFE IN CHRIST
HYMN 380 There is a green hill far away (David Oattes)
HYMN 419 Thine be the glory! (Kathy Craig)
HYMN 477 Lo, he comes with clouds descending (John Reid)
Offering, during which we sing CH4 547 What a friend we have in Jesus (Shena Dougal)
DEDICATION OF OFFERING,
HYMN 396 And can it be, that I should gain (omit v2) (Norah Gray)
BENEDICTION & 3-FOLD AMEN
HYMN 220 The day you gave us, Lord, has ended (Anne Hodge)
ORGAN RECESSIONAL
Now, thank we all our God (Arr. Virgil Fox)

It may interest you to see the “narrative” which follows below for the introduction to each hymn that was used by the people who had chosen their favourite hymns.  Each person also added a small personal reason for why the hymn meant something to them.

512 TO GOD BE THE GLORY
If a hymn can die, can it live again? The life story of “To God Be The Glory” proves that the answer is ‘yes!’ Originally composed in America sometime before 1875, it was almost immediately forgotten in its native land. In 1954, however, “To God Be The Glory” was rediscovered and claimed as a new favourite. We have the Billy Graham crusades to thank for this hymns “re-birth”. Written by Frances van Alstyne (nee Crosby) who was born blind. It is from her “Brightest and Best 1875”. We sing it to the good old Redemption tune by William Doane.

485 DEAR LORD AND FATHER
The words are taken from a prayer contained in the long poem The Brewing of Soma by American Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier. He ends by describing the true method for contact with the divine, as practiced by Quakers: Sober lives dedicated to doing God’s will, seeking silence and selflessness in order to hear the “still, small voice” described in I Kings 19:11-13 as the authentic voice of God, rather than earthquake, wind or fire. REPTON is from Parry’s oratorio Judith in which there is a dialogue duet where the line “Long since in Egypt’s plenteous land”. The tune was first used for this Hymn in “The Repton School Hymn Book 1924” hence its name.

THE KING OF LOVE – 462
This is a version of Psalm 23 written by Sir Henry Baker for Hymns Ancient and Modern 1868. Dominus Regit Me was composed for this hymn by Dykes for Hymns Ancient and Modern.

LOVE DIVINE – 519
Charles Wesley’s hymn from “Hymns for those that seek and those that have Redemption in the Blood of Christ 1747” – the form that we use is from Wesley’s “Collection of hymns 1780” which omits one verse. It was entitled “Jesus show us thy salvation”.

478 BEHOLD THE AMAZING GIFT OF LOVE
Paraphrase 63 from Scottish Paraphrases 1781, based on 1 John 3: 1-3. It is a revision of Watt’s “Behold what wondrous grace” a hymn of 6 verses in Short Metre, published in Hymns and Spiritual Songs 1709 where is was entitled Adoption. The text here is William Cameron’s revision for the Scottish Paraphrases.

715 BEHOLD THE MOUNTAIN OF THE LORD
Paraphrase 18 based on Isaiah 2:2-6. It had appeared in the Scottish Paraphrases 1745. “In latter days the mount of God” by an unknown author. It was possibly revised and v3 added by Michael Bruce. Logan included it in his Poems 1781, but it is by Bruce. It is in CH4 in the form it appeared in the Scottish Paraphrases 1781, and of CH3 1973.

259 BEAUTY FOR BROKENESS
Written by Graham Kendrick, one of the UKs most prolific composer of worship material and hymns in the late 20th Century, we wonder if there are any other new hymns for evangelicals that reflect the holistic meaning of salvation as well as this one?

251 I, THE LORD OF SEA AND SKY
Composed by Dan Schutte in 1981 after Vatican Council II. Its words are based on Isaiah 6:8 and 1 Samuel 3. Despite its Catholic origins, the hymn is often sung in many Protestant worship services as well, particularly services that are contemporary rather than traditional in structure and format.

448 LORD THE LIGHT OF YOUR LOVE
Another of the “new breed” of contemporary worship songs, again by Kendrick. This hymn has become a firm favourite of many congregations, transcending all ages.

380 THERE IS A GREEN HILL FAR AWAY
From Mrs. Alexander’s “Hymns for Little Children 1848” written to illustrate “Suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, dead and buried”. HORSLEY is from “Twenty-four Psalm Tunes and 8 Chants” composed by William Horsley, where is has no name.

419 THINE BE THE GLORY
The hymn “A toi la gloire” was written by Edmund Budry, pastor in Vevey Switzerland, during the year 1896 after the death of his first wife. It appeared in the “YMCA Hymn Book, Lausanne 1904” translated by Richard Hoyle. MACCABAEUS is an arrangement of the chorus “See the conquering hero comes” in Handel’s oratorio Judas Maccabaeus 1746.

477 LO HE COMES WITH CLOUDS DESCENDING
Vs 1, 2 & 4 go back to Wesley’s form in “Hymns of Intercession for all mankind 1758” and v3 to Cennick’s in his “Collection of Sacred Hymns 1752”, as arranged in 1760, where is had 6 verses, of which 3rd and 5th are now omitted. HELMSLEY is attributed to Thomas Olivers, but its origin is much discussed. It may be an adaptation of an 18th Cent. ballad known as “Guardian Angels”. It reappears in a different from in Wesley’s “Select Hymns 1765”

547 WHAT A FRIEND WE HAVE
This hymn was written by Joseph Scriven as a poem in 1855 to comfort his mother who was living in Ireland while he was in Canada. Scriven originally published the poem anonymously, and only received full credit for it in the 1880s.

396 AND CAN IT BE
Written by Charles Wesley at “Little Britain” London on 23 May 1738. It is based on his own conversion experience. It was published in 1738. SAGINA, by Thomas Campbell is almost universally associated with “And Can It Be.” Little is known of Campbell other than his publication The Bouquet (1825), in which each of twenty-three tunes has a horticultural name. SAGINA borrows its name from a genus of the pink family of herbs, which includes baby’s breath and the carnation. We sing this tune vigorously and in parts, especially at the refrain!

220 THE DAY YOU GAVE US
The final form of Ellerton’s hymns, which was written in 1870 for “A Liturgy for Mission Meetings” appeared in “Church Hymns 1871”. ST CLEMENT by CC Scholefield appeared in “Church Hymns with Tunes 1874” for which it was specifically composed for these words.

SUMMER SONGS OF PRAISE – 5th June @ 6:30pm

Organ Anniversary celebrations continue with a Summer Songs of Praise on Sunday 5th June at 6:30pm.  Williamwood’s favourite hymns make up the service and to nominate your own personal all time favourite item of praise you need to contact Alan Mathew, Organist and Choirmaster, by Thursday 26th May at the very latest.

Email Alan by clicking here, or contact by mobile phone/SMS text (07852 908166)

Download a poster to help publicise the service by clicking the image below.